Buyers Guide

 

Although buying an electric car new is more expensive than buying a petrol or a diesel car. There are government grants available that can help reduce the cost. These cash incentives that the government provide have and can change any time. Here is the link to the gov.uk website with all the up to date information you need on their current EV purchase grants. Also consider the overall running costs can be considerably cheaper than a conventional ICE (internal combustion engine) vehicle over time. Less moving parts, less to go wrong.

 

At the time of writing this article the maximum grant available for cars is £3,500. Many car makers also offer incentives such as scrappage schemes which can also help drive down the cost of buying an electric vehicle. These incentives and the savings you could make on petrol or diesel fuel prices could mean an electric vehicle could just be for you.

There is a lot to take in and understand when you start looking at purchasing your first electric vehicle. Click here to see our 'jargon buster' guide which will give you all the information you will need in brief to help understand all those abbreviations and technical names that may seam to have been created just to confuse you even more.

So let us take a look into the wonderful world of electric vehicles and help you understand that it's not all that scary. To start with, we will go through what different types of electric vehicles are available right now.

Fully electric vehicles

First off you have the all electric vehicles known as an EV (electric vehicle).

These vehicles work solely on battery power. The engine is replaced with an

electric motor that gets its power from the batteries which are charged by

plugging your vehicle into a charger point. EV's can have a range of

60 to 300 plus miles depending on your battery size and of course how much

of your hard earned cash you wish to part with. Battery technology is getting

better all the time so the range that these vehicles can travel is only going to

get better. The cost of these batteries is also falling year by year. The amount

of charging stations that are popping up all over the world is dramatically

increasing day by day. We recommend you try downloading apps like

PlugShare and Zap-Map. These will tell you where all the charge points are you could ever need. I personally find them very useful indeed.

 

Hybrid electric vehicles

Next you have Hybrid vehicles. These vehicles are more like your conventional

car or van that's sitting out side your house right now. Hybrids have a normal

petrol or diesel engine that is accompanied with an electric motor. The battery

can not be charged by plugging into a charge point but can be charged via

the petrol or diesel engine and also through regenerative braking. Regenerative

braking captures the energy that's usually lost under braking and stores it into

the battery for you to use with your electric motor. The batteries in hybrids

generally only allow you to travel a couple of miles before needing ICE (internal

combustion engine) to maintain charged. They are quite economical to run but still have a lot of moving parts and omit tailpipe emissions

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles

 

These are known as PHEV's. Combine a petrol or diesel engine with an electric

motor and a  fairly large rechargeable battery. Unlike conventional hybrids,

PHEV's can be plugged-in and recharged from an most electrical outlet, allowing

them to drive extended distances using just electricity. For example the highly

popular Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has a fully electric range of about 25 miles.

These normally come with an EVSE cable only from the manufacturers, This

allows you to plug the vehicle in through a normal domestic socket. Charge

times vary depending on battery size and your power outlet. Some PHEV,s are

capable of rapid charging too like the fully electric vehicles. This can get you from 20% to 80% of charge in around 30 minutes.

More information about all of the types of vehicles above can be found by dropping us an email or live online chat. We are always happy to help in anyway possible.